Article

Original Article

Ann Lab Med 2022; 42(2): 258-267

Published online March 1, 2022 https://doi.org/10.3343/alm.2022.42.2.258

Copyright © Korean Society for Laboratory Medicine.

Perceptions and Experiences of Migrants in Korea Regarding Blood Donation in Association with Sociodemographic Status

Hyerin Kim, M.D.1 , Kyung-Hwa Shin, M.D., Ph.D.1 , Hyung-Hoi Kim, M.D., Ph.D.1,2,* , and Hyun-Ji Lee, M.D., Ph.D.3,*

1Department of Laboratory Medicine, 2Biomedical Informatics Unit, Pusan National University Hospital, Busan, Korea; 3Department of Laboratory Medicine and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital, Yangsan, Korea

Correspondence to: Hyun-Ji Lee, M.D., Ph.D.
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Research Institute for Convergence of Biomedical Science and Technology, Pusan National University Yangsan Hospital and Pusan National University School of Medicine, 20 Geumo-ro, Mulgeum-eup, Yangsan 50612, Korea
Tel: +82-55-360-1875
Fax: +82-55-360-1880
E-mail: hilhj1120@gmail.com

Hyung-Hoi Kim, M.D., Ph.D.
Department of Laboratory Medicine and Biomedical Informatics Unit, Pusan National University Hospital and Pusan National University School of Medicine, 179 Gudeok-ro, Seo-gu, Busan 49241, Korea
Tel: +82-51-240-7418
Fax:+82-51-247-6560
E-mail: hhkim@pusan.ac.kr

Received: January 27, 2021; Revised: May 11, 2021; Accepted: September 15, 2021

This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0) which permits unrestricted non-commercial use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Background: With increasing number of migrants in Korea, there is an increasing need for blood products with rare blood antigens. Accordingly, the role of blood donors among migrants has been acknowledged. We investigated migrants’ experiences and perceptions of blood donation along with their sociodemographic status and identified the effects on self-reported blood donation status.
Methods: A cross-sectional survey using a self-developed, structured questionnaire was conducted on 479 migrants. The questionnaire included items about experiences, knowledge, and perceptions on blood donation and sociodemographic factors of respondents.
Results: Most migrants in this study were from Southeast Asia (54.7%) or China (39.9%). Among them, 28.6% (N=137) had donated blood previously, and 2.7% (N=13) had previously donated blood in Korea. All previous blood donors were volunteers, and the two major deterrents of blood donation for non-donors were the fear of pain and lack of knowledge about blood donation. In multivariable logistic regression analysis, the country of birth (odds ratio [OR]=2.65, P<0.001 [China]; OR=4.85, P=0.001 [countries other than China and Southeast Asian countries]) and employment status (OR=2.80, P=0.034) were independently associated with blood donation.
Conclusions: This is the first Korean study to analyze migrants’ experiences and perceptions of blood donation in relation to their sociodemographic status. Our findings can help establish blood donation policies for migrants, devise campaigns to enhance blood donation awareness, and ultimately create a pool of rare blood resources in a multicultural society.

Keywords: Blood donation, Migrants, Survey, Sociodemographic factors